Going Green at Home with Energy Storage

August 2019

Going Green at Home with Energy Storage

 

Home energy storage systems make the most of electricity and heat by storing it so that you can use the energy when you need it most. They are particularly useful for people with home renewable energy systems who can use more of the clean energy that they generate at home, whilst reducing their fuel bills and carbon emissions.

 

Renewable energy storage solutions in domestic properties are undergoing a quiet revolution. Banks of batteries with an inverter-charger can power most of your household requirements with the exception of hot water and electric cooking. A simple domestic home kit such as this can power things around the home and recharge on Economy 7 overnight.

 

However, early solutions have been badly-advertised and have suffered from a negative perception due to their cost-prohibitive pricing. The Tesla Powerwall, for example, is based on rechargeable lithium-ion battery stationary energy storage products but has yet to make much of a commercial impact due to its cost of several thousand pounds.

 

Solar panels are more cost-effective and can feed a home system but other possibilities include harnessing energy from winds and tides, or a reasonably cost-effective system could be installed using the latest Lead Carbon batteries for under £2,000.

 

The home building industry really needs to take a look at this and consider its options. Energy for new builds could all be stored in the houses themselves or in community storage where a small container could feed up to 20-30 houses.

 

The Government may also take a lead on this initiative, forcing house builders to adapt so that the price would tumble for bulk orders.

 

In the UK, we're already seeing smart new ways to store solar energy in our homes with solutions such as Powervault, the UK's first fully-integrated home energy storage system that stores energy during the day and releases it in the evening when household energy demand peaks. But how long will we have to wait until such systems gain commercial traction with home owners and how long before we see high street retailers selling home domestic systems?!

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